The Woman in White: #Spooktober Book Review

The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins was not exactly what I expected. I thought it would be more of a Gothic novel but it’s more of a mystery novel. It was still a great book. The Woman in White is considered to be Collins’ greatest work.

The book is set in the United Kingdom – Cumberland County, London and Hampshire.

There’s not just one main character. The story follows sisters Laura Fairlie and Marian Halcombe, as well as The Woman in White, Anne Catherick. The drawing teacher, Walter Hartright, helps the sisters to piece together the mystery.

The Woman in White meets Hartright on the way to Limmeridge House, where Laura and Marian are residing. Anne has just escaped from the asylum, where she was placed by Sir Percival Glyde, Laura’s fiance. The question for most of the book is why is Sir Percival so interested in finding Anne? She must know something about him that could damage his reputation but what?

After leaving Limmeridge House, Hartright joins an expedition to South America. He and Laura are in love but she still marries Sir Percival. Laura and Marian both move to Sir Percival’s estate at Blackwater Park, where they meet Count Fosco, who is married to their estranged aunt. Count Fosco and Sir Percival are definitely plotting against Laura and Marian in order to get Laura’s fortune. It is unbelievable what people will do for money.

I cannot tell you anything without giving away everything. Trust me when I say, it’s a great book and worth reading.

If you like mysteries like Agatha Christie or Hitchcock movies, then you will love this book. If you are plotting against someone to get their money, then you should read something else.

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One comment

  1. Many years ago, the Mystery series that was on PBS on Thursday nights aired a production of “The Woman in White.” That was my first introduction to the book, which I read later and loved. I love mystery novels! Wilkie Collins also wrote “The Moonstone,” which is a good mystery, too.

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